(Shutterstock)

Mouth-Watering Menus

Who has the best in the region?

In the Capital Region, we’re lucky to be surrounded by an abundance of farm-to-fork fresh food, plus chefs who know how to showcase the flavors of our region. So you tell us: Who has the best menu around? 

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Food for Thought

Acuity with Chris Jarosz

Chris Jarosz is the founder of Broderick Restaurant & Bar and co-owner of the Wicked ‘Wich food truck. This year, he also took on the overhaul of midtown’s Capital Dime restaurant and its sister eatery, Trick Pony, which have been folded into the Broderick Roadhouse family of restaurants. It’s not all glamorous, but it is pretty tasty.

Dec 15, 2014 Christine Calvin
Volha Mazuronak broke the women's fastest time on the course to date with her finish of 2:27:30.

(photos: Rich Beckermeyer)

2014 California International Marathon (CIM)

Several records broken, many legs shaken and few bodies unbruised by the end of this year’s California International Marathon. About 15,000 participants ran a grueling 26.2 miles in the Sacramento Running Association’s CIM. Over 50,000 spectators cheered runners on along the downhill course last Sunday.

Dec 9, 2014 Rich Beckermeyer
Stuart Spencer is the owner of St. Amant Winery in Lodi. He and eleven other local winemakers have joined together to launch the Lodi Native Project, an effort to produce all-natural Zinfandels that highlight the truest flavors of Lodi’s oldest vineyards.

Going Native

A breakdown of the Lodi wine scene

Zinfandel from Lodi’s Mokelumne River American Viticultural Area comes in two main styles: west side and east side. West-side vineyards, with their shallower soil, have lusher growth and tend to be earthier or loamier, sometimes pungently compost-like. East-side vineyards have a lower water table, producing smaller clusters and smaller fruit, which generally have more color, tannin and acidity.

Dec 9, 2014 Russell Nichols
(Shutterstock)

Taste the Vineyard

Lodi vintners are taking a minimalist approach to create all-natural Zinfandels from heritage vines

You might say the old grapevines look otherworldly. With their contorted limbs and thick trunks, these Zinfandel vines look more like squat alien-trees, twisting up out of a sandy 3-acre spit of land in southwest Lodi. “Look how this vine is growing here,” says Stuart Spencer, owner of St. Amant Winery. He’s standing in the dirt at nearby Marian’s Vineyard, pointing to a vine with a hole as big as a fist. “The vine just splits over time.”

Dec 9, 2014 Russell Nichols